Workshops

Climate, Resiliency and the Environment

  • Ask a Native American about Reziliance!
    • The Presentation will discuss the Native American Perspective of what agriculture, climate and environment means to the first stewards of Turtle Island (United States).
      • Presenter:
        • Nick Hernandez, Thunder Valley CDC (SD) - Nick Hernandez, Director of the Food Sovereignty Initiative, for the Thunder Valley Community Development Cooperation. He is a citizen of the Oglala Lakota Oyate and lives on the Pine Ridge Reservation (SD). Today Nick is leading the effort to develop a sovereign regenerative food system for his homelands and people.

Equitable Economics and Fair Labor

  • Building Assets for Health and Harvest: Designing A Community Food Center for the Oneida Nation
    • The Oneida Nation has a bold vision to improve the health of its community by providing a place to teach people to grow, process, prepare and serve healthful Native foods, serving not only Oneida tribal members but also regional food producers, entrepreneurs, and those seeking jobs in the food industry.
      • Presenters:
        • Kathy Nyquist, New Venture Advisors (IL) - Kathy's work has led to numerous business launches, publications, speaking engagements and trainings focused on developing food systems that are good for farmers, consumers and the intermediaries that connect them. She spent 20 years working with Fortune 100 companies and received an MBA with honors from the University of Chicago.
        • Joanie Buckley, Oneida Nation (WI) - Joanie leads eight departments for Oneida Nation. Through her work on various initiatives she promotes partnerships with foundations, governmental agencies, academics and other tribal governments to develop grassroots solutions for underrepresented groups to build healthy communities. She holds a Doctorate of Business Administration focused on Native American Banking from UW-Whitewater.

 

  • Expanding Impact through Programming: A Panel Discussion with Mission-driven Incubator Kitchens
    • Come hear from some of the country's leading kitchen incubators on how building entrepreneurship ecosystems can help cultivate food businesses, create meaningful work, and build economic resiliency.
      • Presenters:
        • Ashley Colpaart, The Food Corridor (CO) - Ashley is founder and CEO of The Food Corridor, a virtual food hub that connects food entrepreneurs to commercial kitchen space. She also facilitates the Network for Incubator and Commissary Kitchens.
        • Devita Davidson, Foodlab Detroit (MI) - A native of Detroit and daughter of a preacher, Devita, uses fiery talk, wide-open arms, and an insatiable appetite for reading the latest in food justice and innovation, to propel the growth of FoodLab Detroit to create a food system truly equitable, sustainable, cooperative and community driven.
        • Geetika Agrawal, La Cocina (CA) - As the Program Director at La Cocina, Geetika loves working alongside the incredible La Cocina entrepreneurs to support their businesses, leading growth initiatives for the organization, and of course, and sharing delicious food.
        • Roz Freeman, Commonwealth Kitchen (MA) - Roz is the first person you'll see when you contact CWK as an entrepreneur. She helps entrepreneurs get their businesses up and running with CWK, organizes our events and educational programs, and develops and manages our partnerships with job training programs and business planning organizations.

Food and Fish for All

  • Building Food Sovereignty on the Border
    • This session will explore the challenges and significance of leveraging the power of a cooperative in an area where the market demand is low due to the socio-economics. We will discuss ideas around how to build a financially sustainable model for small, young, minority farmers in low-income areas.
      • Presenters:
        • Allison Kaika, Frontera Farmers Coalition (TX), Allison Kaika is a Masters Student at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley studying Agricultural, Environmental, and Sustainability Sciences. Her research explores small farm viability and farmer quality of life. She is currently writing a Masters thesis around the connection to civic agriculture and civic engagement.
        • Vanessa Schroeder, Frontera Farmers Coalition (TX) - Vanessa Schroeder has a BA in Social Studies from the University of Texas at Brownsville. She currently teaches 8th grade Social Studies in the La Joya Independent School District. She, along with her partner and 15 year old daughter, run Sunshine's Bounty Urban Farm and are all currently members of the Frontera Farmer's Coalition(FFC) Cooperative. Sunshine's Bounty specializes in leafy greens and culinary herbs.
        • Alexis Racelis, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (TX)

 

  • The Power of Workers and Animal Welfare Voices: An Unlikely Duo for Equitable Food Procurement
    • Ten institutions in six cities are shifting millions of dollars towards food that's fair, local, humane, sustainable, and healthy. In this workshop, we'll share stories from the invisible corners of our food system and collective strategies for expanding workers' rights, animal welfare, food sovereignty and racial equity through public procurement.
      • Presenters:
        • Christina Spach, Food Chain Workers Alliance (SC) - Christina Spach is a National Organizer for Food Chain Workers Alliance. She provides direct campaign support to grassroots coalitions working to win and implement the Good Food Purchasing Program as well as leveraging it to support worker organizing.
        • Nezahualcoyotl Xiuhtecutli, Farmworker Association of Florida (FL) - 
          Neza Xiuhtecutli is Research Coordinator with the Farmworker Association of Florida. He works with research institutions whose work focuses on farmworker health and working conditions in the Southeast as a platform to advocate for state and national policy for better occupational protections and social safety nets for agricultural workers.
        • Suzanne McMillan, ASPCA (CO) - Suzanne McMillan is Content Director for the ASPCA's Farm Animal Welfare program. She works to improve the lives of animals raised for food through regulatory and legislative efforts housed within the ASPCA's Shop With Your Heart campaign.
        • Marlie Wilson, Chicago Food Policy Action Council (IL) - Marlie Wilson supports the implementation of GFPP with the City of Chicago and Cook County's departments and sister agencies. She has spent the past decade working to foster more fair, healthy, and sustainable food systems through farm to school program development and institutional local food procurement. 
        • Misty Olsson, Austin Independent School District (TX) - Misty has been purchasing food and supplies necessary to feed the students of Austin ISD for over seven years. In addition to purchasing, Misty has 10 years of experience working with manufacturers and distributors in the K-12 sector. During the last three years, Misty has achieved three stars within GFPP and is working towards four stars. Partnering with the Life Time Foundation, she has acquired over 90% clean label menu items. She continues to grow Austin ISD's local sourcing portfolio which is currently 46% of the food budget. Misty is working to procure local grass-fed beef, increase organic produce offerings, and accomplish 100% clean label.

 

  • Cultivating Healthy Community Food Systems through Farm to Early Care and Education Partnerships
    • Collaborative farm to early care and education (ECE) initiatives have the potential to bring healthy local food opportunities to young children and families while bolstering local food systems through new market opportunities. Hear national, state, and local level examples of farm to ECE collaborations that connect ECE and food systems.
      • Presenters:
        • Lacy Stephens, National Farm to School Network (MT) - Lacy Stephens, MS, RDN, Program Manager with the National Farm to School Network, works to expand the farm to school and farm to early care and education movement through information sharing, network building, and advocacy at the national, state, and local levels.
        • Abbie Chaddick, Georgia Organics (GA) - Abbie is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and oversees Georgia Organics’ nutrition programming for early care educators and administrators. She works closely with a diverse set of early learning advocates to expand child care centers’ access to nutritious food and garden and food based learning opportunities.
        • Shironda Brown, NC State University Center for Environmental Farming Systems (NC) - Shironda Brown is the Training Coordinator for the Farm to Early Care and Education Initiative at the Center for Environmental Farming Systems. Shironda earned a B.S. Degree in Child Development and Family Relations from East Carolina University and has worked in the Early Childhood field for over twenty years.
        • Erin Croom, Georgia Organics (GA) - Erin Croom, MS serves as Georgia's Farm to Early Care Coordinator for Georgia Organics. In 2008, Erin established Georgia's farm to school programming, which has been adopted by over 70 school districts that served 97 million local food meals, grew 885 school gardens and conducted 8,000 taste tests last year.

 

  • You Too Can Do It! Lessons Learned & Discussion from a SNAP Incentive Ambassador Program
    • Being a Community Food Advocate provides people who have experienced housing instability, joblessness, poverty, and hunger with training and support to effectively lead local outreach while developing leadership skills. This session will offer an activity on being the best advocate you can be through non-verbal, intrapersonal and communication skills.
      • Presenters:
        • Tamara Anne Orndoff, LiveWell Colorado (CO) - Tamara is the Community Food Advocate in Jefferson County. Tamara has been advocating for food, animal, and local business issues for 30 years, bringing a unique passion and strategy that takes advocating to another level. She currently reaches food assistance recipients to double up their food purchases with Colorado Produce.
        • Refugio Venegas, LiveWell Colorado (CO) - I was born in Los Angeles and am married with two children. I've been an Advocate since Summer 2018. I see how expensive healthy foods are to some families here in Colorado and the Country, so I help to promote options for families to have access to more fresh produce.
        • Caronne Porter, LiveWell Colorado (CO) - Caronne supports and strengthens multiple programs and initiatives currently being advanced by LiveWell, with a specific focus on Double Up Food Bucks and related programs. As a key member of the food systems team, she provides partner outreach and engagement, coordinates program logistics, and develops ways to deepen existing programs.

 

  • Building Community and Family Resilience through Home Food Gardens
    • In the U.S., the contributions of home food gardens to the quality of urban life have been overlooked by policymakers and NGOs. In this session, we will explore opportunities for catalyzing the development of sustainable home gardens by leveraging existing community resources, including the agricultural knowledge of diverse community members.
      • Presenters:
        • Rosario Hernandez, Historic Westside Gardens (GA) - 
          Of Puerto Rican and Dominican heritage, grandmother of 10, and Atlanta Westside resident for 10 years, Rosario retired from teaching and trained to become an urban grower, leading the Historic Westside Gardens' coaches and developing the Westside Growers Market to provide neighborhood residents with fresh, local affordable produce.
        • Gil Frank, Historic Westside Gardens (GA) - Gil is co-founder of Historic Westside Gardens, a philosopher, and an activist with twenty years of experience in a collective village (kibbutz). He believes food is a catalyst to individual and community self-determination and is a fierce advocate for home food gardening as a model for change through civic agriculture.
        • John Taylor, University of Rhode Island (RI) - John earned a PhD in Crop Sciences from the University of Illinois and a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the University of Michigan. His research explores the social and ecological dynamics of food production at multiple scales--from home gardens to commercial farms--with the overall goal of strengthening local food systems.

 

  • Seafood Access Among New Americans
    • Migration impacts the way one eats, especially when migrating to the U.S. Fish is the center of many diets- but are New Americans able to get enough? This session will address the barriers immigrants and refugees face to accessing seafood and what can be done to ensure cultural diet maintenance.
      • Presenter:
        • Anna Derian, Tufts University/ Gulf of Maine Research Institute (MA) - Anna is a recent graduate of Tufts University Friedman School and School of Medicine, with an M.S. in Food Policy and Applied Nutrition and a Masters in Public Health. She spent last summer researching the barriers immigrants and refugees in Maine face to accessing fresh seafood.

 

  • Fishadelphia: A community seafood program
    • Fishadelphia is a community seafood program based in Philadelphia, bringing fresh seafood from regional harvesters/processors to economically/culturally diverse consumers at reasonable prices. Fishadelphia's day-to-day operations are coordinated by high school students. We will talk about success, challenges, and joys of this project.
      • Presenters:
        • Tasha Palacio, Fishadelphia (PA) - Tasha wishes she had had more access to fresh food as a young person; one reason she is motivated to participate in Fishadelphia is that she wants to make sure more people have access to high quality fresh food. She has facilitated groups of young people for nearly a decade.
        • Nia Minard, Fishadelphia (PA) - Nia, a Black woman from Mississippi, is a food justice advocate and culinary artist and educator who has lived in Philadelphia for 15 years; she has acted as chef for a number of community organizations and art installations.

"Food for Thought"

  • Growing Together: Cultivating White Accomplices in the Struggle for Black Liberation & Racial Equity
    • This discussion-based session is designed for white food systems practitioners who strive to further racial equity in their work and their lives. Facilitators aim to create a space for vulnerability, problem-solving, and mutual support & accountability. Session is open to all, but geared towards white folks living/working in the South.
      • Presenters:
        • Alice Evans, Alabama Sustainable Agriculture Network (ASAN) (AL) - Alice has been the Executive Director of the Alabama Sustainable Agriculture Network since 2013. She has organized for -- and been trained and grown by -- Southern-rooted, intersectional movements for LGBTQ+ liberation and immigrant justice. She lives in Birmingham with her partner Lisa and their baby Moss.
        • Liz Broussard, National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) (MS) - Liz is a transplant from Concord, NH who has made Jackson, MS home. Over the past three years, Liz has provided capacity-building and technical support for the Mississippi Food Justice Collaborative, a network of organizations working to improve access to healthy food and catalyze systemic change in Mississippi food systems.
        • Rachael Reichenbach (FL) - Rachael was born and raised in Dallas, Texas and currently resides in Tallahassee, Florida. Over the past three years she has held various roles in the Florida food system and in 2018 she served as the co-chair of the Florida Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival.

 

  • Hay Que Comer: Bridging Local Foods and Ethnic Knowledge through Participatory Action
    • Hay Que Comer is a project that will be a best practices model on how to include the Latino population in sustainable food outreach. Engaging community from the microbiological (local foods) to the macrosocial (cultural food practices) is key. This workshop's interactive presentation will include a community preparation of Pico de Gallo and Mexican Fruit Cup! So come ready to prepare fruits and vegetables  alongside your fellow conference members. As we enjoy the fruits of our labor, Ms. Blaginin will discuss her project from last summer, Hay Que Comer. Please join us as we engage in the true meanings of community.
      • Presenter:
        • Karla Blaginin, Dichos de la Casa (GA) - Karla Blaginin is a first-generation Asian/Latina food scholar. Her multidisciplinary background includes a bachelor's degree in Mathematics and Sociology/Anthropology, a master's degree in Statistics and the completion of PhD coursework in Sociology. She engages the study of gut microbiome and environmental sciences which informs her writings on cultural foods.

 

  • Farmers Growing Cultural Crops for Diverse Communities
    • This panel will discuss successful market strategies that prioritize the production and promotion of cultural and specialty crops. Hear from farmers, farm service providers and advocates about successful marketing models that support the development of diverse farmer-led food enterprises and the importance of creating spaces for diverse crops at market.
      • Presenters:
        • Maria Moreira, World Farmers (MA) - Maria has been a leading force in identifying and establishing market opportunities for ethnic crops in Massachusetts and increasing access to culturally appropriate crops for immigrant and refugee communities since 1984. Maria is active on numerous Organizational Boards, and always prioritizes bringing the voice of the farmer to the table.
        • Lorette Picciano, Rural Coalition (DC) - Lorette Picciano has served since 1992 as Executive Director of the Rural Coalition. Lorette works directly with the diverse Membership and Board Members to promote just and sustainable development in rural areas, participating in 7 Farm Bill Debates, to assure equal access to USDA programs for farmers, ranchers, and farmworkers.
        • Darnella Burkett Winston, Mississippi Association of Cooperatives (MS) - Darnella is a graduate of Alcorn State University with degrees in consumer science and agriculture, and farms her family's 255 acre farm in Mississippi with her father, Ben Burkett. Darnella is a lead representative for the Mississippi Association of Cooperatives, where she spearheads their farm to school efforts.
        • Tirso Moreno (FL) - An independent farmworker advocate in Florida with decades of experience, Tirso works tirelessly to support farmworkers in his network, fighting for fair labor practices and wage. He also assists farmworkers in their transition to farmers in the US. Previously, Tirso was Executive Director for the Farmworkers Association of Florida.

 

  • Urban Agricultural Training: A Bridge to Healing, Food Sovereignty, & Opportunity for Women Transition
    • This past year Atlanta Community Food Bank, Trellis Horticultural Therapy Alliance and The Paideia School's Urban Agriculture program, in partnership with the Georgia Department of Corrections, established the Give Back Garden, a garden-based training program for residents at Metro Transitional Center (MTC). Participants in this program develop agricultural skills that will connect them with job opportunities when they transition out of MTC. Their garden also serves as a site for horticultural therapy and "Empower Hour" classes focused on well-being and leadership development.  Experienced Paideia student farmers assisted the MTC residents with their garden installation, and continue to support them during monthly training workshops. On this panel, community partners will reflect and share insights about the launch of this innovative and comprehensive program. In doing so, we channel the voices of program participants who are deepening connections with the land, themselves and one another as they grow food for local communities.
      • Presenters:
        • Tami Boyd, Atlanta Community Food Bank (GA) - 
          Tami Boyd is currently a Food Oasis Community Coordinator with the Atlanta Community Food Bank. She works directly with the community to develop and implement resident-driven solutions to improve fresh and healthy food access and increase food security in the historic south and west side neighborhoods of Atlanta.
        • Leah Clements, Give Back Garden Program Coordinator (GA) - My work background is in restorative justice and more recently urban agriculture, with growing interest in their intersection. And it's no wonder - I'm living into and reshaping my Midwestern - Georgia inheritance as a farmer and advocate.
        • Tania Herbert, Urban Agriculture Coordinator (GA) - I have been a Farmer/Educator at the Paideia School for past 8 years.  I use regenerative farming practices, our students convert lawns in the neighborhood into food producing oases. These urban farms help to connect our students to the natural world and create opportunities for
          hands-on learning while working towards a more equitable food system.
        • Rachel Cochran, Trellis Inc (GA) - Rachel Cochran is a co-founder of the Atlanta-based nonprofit Trellis Horticultural Therapy Alliance launched in 2017. Prior to launching Trellis, she had a 12-year history working as an environmental specialist with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. In 2014, she earned a certificate in horticultural therapy. Trellis specializes in helping people.
        • Erin Cescutti, Paideia School (GA) - Erin Cescuttiis a farmer/educator with the Paideia school. She has a horticulture degree from UGA and brings a tremendous amount of farming experience to the Paideia Urban Agriculture program.

 

  • Incorporating an Intersectionality Paradigm into Food System Workforce Development
    • Individuals from deprived communities suffer from the impact of the intersections of their social identities and we must consider those intersections in program design. This session highlights the work DC Central Kitchen does to create meaningful food system careers, expand healthy food access, and test innovative solutions to systemic failures.
      • Presenter:
        • Kimberly Brown, DC Central Kitchen (DC) - Kimberly Brown, Chief Program Officer at DC Central Kitchen, has worked in education and workforce development for over 15 years. Kimberly specializes in developing industry partnerships, and her areas of expertise include workforce development and continuing education, career pathways, and accelerated/contextualized programming.

 

  • The High Costs of Food Systems Development: Misalignment of Resources
    • Building a community-based food system requires significant investment to create long term, dynamic shifts in outcomes. Misalignment between practitioners and funders as they work to achieve shared goals can stymie efforts. Join this lively discussion of funders and practitioners as they deliberate on how to best align resources for sustainability.
      • Presenters:
        • Allison Tohme, Central Louisiana Economic Development Alliance (LA) - Allison earned a Master of Public in 2011 and began her career in academia where she monitored and evaluated community-based obesity prevention programs throughout Louisiana. She brings expertise in program development, evaluation, and coalition building to her work in economic development.
        • John Dean, Central Louisiana Economic Development Alliance (LA) - John Cotton Dean leads CLEDA's Rural Prosperity Initiative, which focuses on empowering rural communities. Dean has over twelve years of professional experience leading rural economic development initiatives across the country, including food policy councils.
        • Michael Tipton, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana Foundation (LA) - Michael Tipton began as President of the Blue Cross Foundation in 2015 after serving as Executive Director of Teach For America - South Louisiana. Michael is from Louisiana and a graduate of LSU. He earned a master's degree in teaching from Pace University while teaching in the South Bronx.
        • Caroline Davis, Keller Enterprises (LA) - Caroline Davis is the President of Keller Enterprises, a family office that manages a portfolio of early-stage investments and initiatives, including Inglewood Farm, the largest organic farm in Louisiana. Caroline oversees the company's efforts to increase access to healthy, local food in Central Louisiana, strengthening community bonds through its provision.
        • Bahia Nightengale, Central Louisiana Economic Development Alliance (LA) - Bahia Nightengale works to strengthen Central Louisiana’s (ten parish) rural economy with the development of resilient farm and ranch businesses that partake in community-based local food systems. Most recently Bahia was the Community Development Manager for the City of Temple, Texas. Originally from rural California (born in Yosemite National Park), she has lived and worked in more than a dozen states working to implement resources with communities that meet the health, social, economic and environmental needs of all residents.

 

  • Why Line Staff are the Gatekeepers We Need for Change
    • Service roles make the restaurant industry. Their positions share the most facetime with our most powerful allies, the consumer. Now imagine these same service role members were trained in food literacy and intersectionality. Their knowledge wouldn't just inform restaurants but their communities. Creating spaces that reinforce equitable engagement.
      • Presenter:
        • Ashtin Berry, Radical Xchange (LA) - I have been speaking at conferences regularly for the past four years. I have done Two keynote speeches, taught over 40 workshops, as well as moderating panels and hosting symposiums. Some examples include S.H.E Summit, Bacardi Leadership Conference, Radical X Change, and many others.

 

  • FarmTruck 912: We Bring the Food to You
    • A discussion of the work of FarmTruck 912, a mobile farmers' market that seeks to improve affordability and accessibility of healthy foods by bringing local seasonal fruits and vegetables to Savannah neighborhoods
      • Presenters:
        • Tasha Cunningham, Forsyth Farmers' Market (GA) - Tasha is the Outreach and Education Coordinator for FFM! Tasha is a health educator and trained herbalist, with a background in Anthropology and Public Health. She is committed to exploring the social determinants of health by facilitating events that inspire others to be more conscious of their relationship with food.
        • Lena Banks, Forsyth Farmers' Market (GA) - Lena is the Farm Truck 912 Coordinator. With a background in Public Health, Lena hopes to gain more knowledge and experience with food justice and community health. She is excited to be able to make a positive impact on the community.

 

  • Putting Equity into Action: National Farm to School Network's Journey
    • A core value and priority since its founding in 2007, National Farm to School Network has been on a journey to put racial and social equity into action through programming and policy advocacy. Come learn about an equity assessment tool, real-world examples, and doing your part to advance equity.
      • Presenters:
        • Helen Dombalis, National Farm to School Network (CO) - Helen Dombalis serves as Executive Director for the National Farm to School Network. In her role, Helen collaborates with stakeholders nationwide to explore and execute farm to school innovation, programming, and advocacy to advance racial and social equity and to grow and sustain the farm to school movement. A native of Raleigh, NC, Helen received a Master of Public Health and a Master of Social Work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is now based in Colorado.
        • Sommer Sibilly-BrownVirgin Islands Good Food Coalition, Inc. - Sommer's journey as a Local Food Advocate began in 2012 with her advocacy for the Virgin Islands to create a comprehensive Farm to School Program for her territory. She then founded Virgin Islands Good Food Coalition, Inc and began advocating for their farm to school efforts to become a part of the National Farm to School Network. She serves as the lead for the Community Food Assessment and Capacity Building efforts in her community post disaster. She is the territories Farm to School Program Manager and National Farm to School Networks Core Partner.
        • Wendy Peters MoschettiLive Well Colorado (CO) - Wendy (BASW, MCP) leads the development and implementation of LiveWell’s strategies related to food systems and food access. She has worked for over 12 years with local, state, and national organizations on a variety of projects aimed at leveraging our food system to improve equitable access to healthy foods.
        • Chloe MarshallNational Farm to School Network (CO) - Chloe Marshall serves as the Policy Specialist for the National Farm to School Network, and is based in their Washington, D.C. office. She previously served as the Maryland Advocacy & Outreach Coordinator with Capital Area Food Bank in Washington, D.C, where she represented the food bank on policy and budget issues locally and on Capitol Hill. She continues to work locally as the founder and co-chair of the Food Justice Coalition of 20743, a collaboration of residents, community organizations, and grassroots leaders who seek community-led solutions to local food equity issues. Chloe is a graduate of Johnson & Wales University with a degree in Culinary Nutrition.

 

  • YOU WORK THE LAND, YOU EAT FROM THE LAND!
    • My personal mantra is 'Start where you are, use what you have, do what you must, just get busy!' When a food need arises the mind begins to come up with ideas on how to rectify or meet the food need at hand. Simple you work, you eat!
      • Presenter: 
        • Nella Frierson, Brooklyn Heights Community Garden (TN) - I Nella '' Ms Pearl'' Frierson a mother of five daughters and five grandchildren have been the owner/operator of Brooklyn Heights Community Garden since 2010! I utilize all my skills from being a licensed cosmetologist, certified Life Coach, Montessori trained Directress, dancer, Poet, Reflexologist, to manifest a meaningful gardening experience!

 

  • Creating an Inclusive Denver Food Vision
    • The Denver Food Vision, with an intensive stakeholder engagement process, sets forth a comprehensive approach to develop the Denver food system. Participants were asked about current needs and dreams for the year 2030. The Denver Food Vision priorities ensure all residents are served by an efficient, and equitable food system.
      • Presenter: 
        • Marion Kalb, City and County of Denver (CO) - 
          Ms. Kalb, from Denver, CO, works to connect farmers and institutional buyers while instituting the Good Food Purchasing Program. Marion spearheaded the national farm to school movement in 2001 and helped draft legislation creating the USDA Farm to School Grant Program.

 

  • Re-imagining How Cities Grow: Planning for gardens and farms in metro Atlanta's future development
    • Metro Atlanta is one of the fastest regions in the country. Learn about a pilot initiative that engages local governments, urban farmers and communities in metro Atlanta cities in a collaborative planning process that prioritizes gardens and farms in the next phase of the region's development.
      • Presenter:
        • Kim Karris, Food Well Alliance (GA) - Karris spent her career developing start-up and digital fundraising strategies for global NGOs. She has worked directly with agricultural communities in Hawaii, Mexico and Central America and received a Masters Degree in Sustainable Food Systems from the UN University for Peace in Costa Rica.

 

  • In Every Seat a Leader: Reimagining Food Systems Leadership
    • Leadership is not for the few and isn't embodied in any one person or organization alone. Everyone has the capacity to be a leader and these times call for a radical rethinking of what leadership means. Let's explore what's possible when we embrace collective leadership to realize food systems change.
      • Presenter:
        • Susan Lightfoot Schempf, Wallace Center at Winrock International (LA) - 
          Susan Lightfoot Schempf brings almost twenty years experience in community organizing, nonprofit leadership, and food systems development to her work at the Wallace Center, where she serves and supports the brilliant community leaders and organizations across America that are using good food as a vehicle for advancing positive social change.

 

  • Edna Lewis and Great Grandma Anna Bell's impact on a GA Tech engineer
    • Edna Lewis, Grande Dame of Southern cooking, understood the relationship between health, farming and sustainable cooking farm-to-table before the term entered the culinary lexicon. Anna Bell's Mac honors Edna Lewis with locally grown food, prepared with time-tested techniques and recipes; locking in health, longevity and vitality.
      • Presenter:
        • Kevin Mobley, Anna Bell's Mac (GA) - A black cook who is bringing back the greatness of American farming and cooking: local food; consumed in season or intelligently preserved; nutrient dense; and sustainably respected

 

  • Farmers Growing Cultural Crops for Diverse Communities
    • This panel will discuss successful market strategies that prioritize the production and promotion of cultural and specialty crops. Hear from farmers, farm service providers and advocates about successful marketing models that support the development of diverse farmer-led food enterprises and the importance of creating spaces for diverse crops at market.
      • Presenters:
        • Maria Moreira, World Farmers (MA) - Maria has been a leading force in identifying and establishing market opportunities for ethnic crops in Massachusetts and increasing access to culturally appropriate crops for immigrant and refugee communities since 1984. Maria is active on numerous Organizational Boards, and always prioritizes bringing the voice of the farmer to the table.
        • Lorette Picciano, Rural Coalition (DC) - Lorette Picciano has served since 1992 as Executive Director of the Rural Coalition. Lorette works directly with the diverse Membership and Board Members to promote just and sustainable development in rural areas, participating in 7 Farm Bill Debates, to assure equal access to USDA programs for farmers, ranchers, and farmworkers.
        • Darnella Burkett Winston, Mississippi Association of Cooperatives (MS) - Darnella is a graduate of Alcorn State University with degrees in consumer science and agriculture, and farms her family's 255 acre farm in Mississippi with her father, Ben Burkett. Darnella is a lead representative for the Mississippi Association of Cooperatives, where she spearheads their farm to school efforts.
        • Tirso Moreno, Farmworker Organizer and Advocate (FL) - An independent farmworker advocate in Florida with decades of experience, Tirso works tirelessly to support farmworkers in his network, fighting for fair labor practices and wage. He also assists farmworkers in their transition to farmers in the US. Previously, Tirso was Executive Director for the Farmworkers Association of Florida.

 

  • The Strategy of Building Equitable Local Food Systems
    • This session will: build a greater sense of how a thriving local food system might look, with practical and replicable examples; explore the maximization of health, equity, economic security and resilience at a community's center; offer strategies for understanding and strengthening diverse communities when building local food systems.
      • Presenter:
        • Susan Pavlin, Taproot (GA) - Susan has founded multiple mission-driven enterprises working with farmers, refugees and immigrants and local food systems. She is the co-founder, Founding Director and current Board Member of Global Growers, in metro-Atlanta, and she was the Founding Director of The Common Market Georgia.

 

  • Food as Medicine and Opportunity: Growing Health and Social Enterprise
    • Through the lens of our presenters' experiences, come learn about the innovative ways New Haven residents across a range of generations and cultural backgrounds are using community garden space to fight back against economic and health disparities.
      • Presenter:
        • Jocelyn Tidwell, New Haven Farms (CT) - With 4 years of experience farming vegetables with high schoolers for (very) local distribution/purchase, a Master's in Adult Education and a background growing up food insecure, Jocelyn is passionate about connecting people to resources to grow food locally and share their skills/knowledge with their neighbors.

 

Measuring and Reporting Impacts

  • School Food Weighed: What Plate Waste Studies Reveal About Student Preference and Consumption
    • This session will use a year-long food disappearance research project conducted with Boston Public Schools as the basis for examining the impact of certain environmental factors and effectiveness of diverse interventions (e.g. nutrition literacy, stakeholder engagement, and infrastructure investments) on student consumption patterns.
      • Presenters:
        • Scott Richardson, Northbound Ventures (MA) - Scott's areas of expertise include identifying, implementing, and measuring the impact and feasibility of projects to improve access to healthy food for underserved populations. He is currently a PhD student in Population Health Sciences at Harvard University's T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Board Member of Food Link.
        • Catalina Lopez-Ospina, City of Boston, Mayor's Office of Food Access (MA) - Appointed by Mayor Walsh in 2016, Catalina's mission is to ensure all Bostonians have access to the food that they need and want. Previously she managed the Boston Public Health Commission's Serving Ourselves Farm, employing homeless individuals to produce food for a homeless shelter and low-income communities.
        • Dr. Juliana Cohen, Merrimack College (MA) - Dr. Cohen's area of expertise is translational research related to children's diets and school-based interventions. She has over 10 years of experience working in public schools, including plate waste analyses, qualitative data collection from cafeteria staff, and environmental interventions to improve the selection and consumption of healthier school meals.
        • Laura Benavidez, Boston Public Schools Food and Nutrition Services (MA) - Laura came to Boston in 2016 from the Los Angeles public school system. She grew up in Texas and planned to become a doctor, but a food science course in college changed everything. For school children, her quest is a “magic formula that will get kids to love food.”

 

  • Rethinking the 'Economics' of Direct-Market (Local) Agriculture
    • This workshop brings together researchers and practitioners to critically discuss the economics of direct-market agriculture. Presenters will discuss the utility of conventional economic concepts for accurately depicting/measuring the impact of direct-market agriculture as well as the need to establish terms/concepts/indicators that would better encompass the realities of direct-market operations.
      • Presenters:
        • Carlos Coleman, USDA-AMS (DC) - Carlos Coleman is an Agricultural Marketing Specialist in the Marketing Services Division who works to improve economic opportunities for small and mid-sized agricultural producers. He researches best practices for the development of direct marketing channels and is interested in exploring their potential for supporting low-income community economic development efforts.
        • Vanessa Shonkwiler, The University of Georgia (GA) - Vanessa P. Shonkwiler is an applied economist with the University of Georgia's Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development specializing in small agribusiness economic development and marketing, and rural strategy analysis.
        • Dr. Andrea Rissing, The Ohio State University (OH) - Andrea Rissing is an anthropologist who completed her PhD in 2019 at Emory University. She is currently a President's Postdoctoral Scholar in the School of Environment and Natural Resources at the Ohio State University. Her research examines producer livelihoods and intersections of different food system scales in the United States.
        • Dr. Hillary King, Community Food Markets (GA) - Dr. Hilary King is Director of Special Projects at Community Farmers Markets and the Sustainable Development Fellow in Emory University's Master's in Development Practice. She has worked with farmers and businesses in the US, Latin America, and East Africa to develop models that foster direct interactions between producers and consumers.

 

  • Increasing Evaluation Capacity for Community-Based Programs: Lessons Learned from Evaluating a Mobile Produce Market in Rhode Island
    • This session will detail RIPHI's evaluation strategy for the Food on the Move (FOTM) program, an evidence-based statewide mobile produce market in RI. This interactive workshop will provide instruction on incorporating an evaluation framework into programs and overview strategies for engaging community members and partners in evaluation approaches.
      • Presenters:
        • Reece Lyerly, Rhode Island Public Health Institute (RI) - Reece Lyerly has worked at the intersection of food systems, public health and social justice for over 10 years as a student, researcher, and non-profit manager. He is passionate about working alongside community organizations to provide reliable data to advocate for sustainable changes related to program development and policies.
        • Eliza Dexter Cohen, Rhode Island Public Health Institute (RI) - Eliza Dexter Cohen works on local, state, and regional policy reform to improve food access and food security. Her passion for food justice began as an intern at the Food Project. She has been involved in numerous related projects, including Food on the Move and the RI Food Policy Council.

Movement Building through Community Partnerships

  • Stories of Change: How integrating arts and culture transforms community food systems work
    • How does both food and art bring us together to dream, design, and actualize change towards more equitable food systems? Hear from community activists and artists whose work inspires place-based, creative food systems transformation and share your own strategies for driving food systems change through arts & culture.
      • Presenters:
        • Maria Elena Rodriguez, DAISA Enterprises (Puerto Rico) - Maria Elena Rodriguez is a Food Systems Associate with DAISA Enterprises, and is based in Puerto Rico. She brings to this role extensive experience with community-based food work including increasing access to healthy food, advocating for food justice, supporting small-scale food producers and artisans, and promoting local food culture.
        • Jamie Hand, ArtPlace America (NY) - As Director of Research Strategies, Jamie Hand designs and leads cross-sector knowledge and network building for ArtPlace America. Previously, Jamie has overseen creative placemaking and design initiatives at the National Endowment for the Arts, Van Alen Institute, and as a consultant to various community development, philanthropic, and open space organizations.
        • Jerry Ann Hebron, Oakland Avenue Urban Farm (MI) - Jerry Hebron is Executive Director of the Northend Christian CDC in Detroit. Here she has helped create the Oakland Avenue Urban Farm - six acres of food production and community space grounded in local culture and history. A native Detroiter, Jerry brings decades of experience in government and real estate.
        • Laura Brown-Lavoie, Sowing Place (RI) - Laura Brown-Lavoie is a poet and farmer in Rhode Island. She has worked for the last three years as an artist facilitator for the City of Providence's Sowing Place initiative, applying collaborative creative practices to the work of organizing neighborhood farmer's markets and community dinners.

 

  • Seeds of Change, Roots of Power: Resource Mapping and Systems Thinking for Food Justice
    • Learn to maximize the resources in your community and uncover connections, cultural knowledge, and other underutilized resources to create an equitable, engaged, and resilient local food system. In this participatory workshop members of the historic Danny Woo Community Garden from Chinatown-International District in Seattle will share their lessons learned.
      • Presenters:
        • Elizabeth Baskerville, InterIm Community Development Association (WA) - Elizabeth is the Garden Manager of the Danny Woo Community Garden in Seattle, WA and is a co-founder of Moral Choice, an anti-racism consulting organization in Seattle, WA. She has Masters degrees in Architecture and Landscape Architecture from the University of Michigan.
        • Angela Patel, InterIm CDA (WA) - Angela Patel is the Sustainable Community Program and Educational Coordinator for the Danny Woo Community Garden. She coordinates volunteers and teaches gardening and environmental justice literacy to children and teens in the garden through Wilderness Inner City Leadership Development (WILD), a program at InterIm CDA.
        • Margarita Ren, Dartmouth College (NH) - Margarita Ren is an Environmental Studies major and Women and Gender Studies minor at Dartmouth College. Her focus is in systems thinking and specifically environmental justice and food justice work. Her thesis is titled "Cultivating Collective Care: Immigrant Biocultural Diversity and Resilience Dynamics in Seattle's Danny Woo Community Garden".

 

  • Sharing a racial equity model through a circle of influence: tools and lessons learned
    • This presentation will highlight tools and processes to operationalize racial equity in our work with food councils. We will share from the perspective of a statewide project support team and also from local food council members. Presenters will share stories, insights, and useful tools for moving this work forward in service to better outcomes for our neighbors and communities.
      • Presenters:
        • Abbey Piner, Community Food Strategies (NC) - 
          Abbey leads the Community Food Strategies project team who addresses systems change with community through a lens of food policy and racial equity.
        • Shorlette Ammons, Center for Environmental Farming Systems (NC) - Shorlette leads the CEFS Committee on Racial Equity team who facilitates racial equity learning and develops strategic tools to address food systems disparities through the lens of structural racism.
        • LaShauna Austria, Alamance Food Collaborative (NC)
        • Anne Meletzke, Alamance Food Collaborative (NC) 

 

  • Community Ownership, Empowerment & Prosperity (COEP) in your Regional Foodshed
    • Grow with the COEP co-chairs as they share their experiences building a regional action team of grassroots organizers tasked with developing justice & sovereignty recommendations to transform the Chesapeake foodshed. Participants will leave with tools to create groups that influence funders & decision-makers towards prioritizing frontline communities working for justice!
      • Presenters:
        • Beth Schermerhorn, Community Ownership, Empowerment & Prosperity Action Team (VA) - 
          Beth's passion for food justice was ignited while running an urban farm in Harrisonburg, VA, working side-by-side with homeless and immigrant communities. Beth works with communities to create multi-lingual, community-based equity action plans. She is a community organizer working on issues of mass incarceration, immigration, environmental justice and gentrification.
        • Aleya Fraser, Community Ownership, Empowerment & Prosperity Action Team (MD) - Aleya is the principal consultant at ACRES Consulting Services. She began organizing farmers-of-color in 2013, inviting people to the black-owned 5 Seeds Farm. That evolved into 3-day agroecology trainings. ACRES Consulting contributes to the future of regenerative food systems by connecting resources, developing programming & providing food sovereignty expertise.

 

  • Bridging Divides: Using Resources to Deepen Partnerships and Build Trust
    • Systems change when new networks supplant the old. In this session, we will provide examples of systemic change led by networks that bridge cultural, socioeconomic, and racial barriers by cultivating leadership of marginalized voices. These examples will include youth leadership within immigrant networks of Moorhead, participatory funding models, and more
      • Presenters:
        • Noelle Harden, University of Minnesota Extension (MN) - Noelle has worked on food systems change for seven years as an Extension Educator. Her educational background is in geography, agroecology and sustainable food production. She has farmed, started a mobile chicken processing business, is co-chair of her community's food policy council, and has presented at many national conferences.
        • Kamaludiin Mohamed, New American Development Agency (MN) - Kamaludiin Mohamed is the Executive Director of the New American Development Agency in Moorhead, Minnesota. He works with dozens of families from the Somali and other new American communities in the Fargo-Moorhead area to provide a range of services and support to help them be more healthy and connected.

 

  • Local Foods, Local Places: Stories and Strategies of Community Revitalization
    • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Local Foods, Local Places technical assistance program helps communities develop action plans to increase economic opportunity, improve access to healthy foods, and revitalize downtowns and existing neighborhoods. Come hear their stories of linking local food system initiatives with place-based investments.
      • Presenters:
        • Holly Fowler, Northbound Ventures (MA) - Holly is a sought after consultant and facilitator for her business, sustainability and food systems expertise, especially her knowledge of institutional food service. She has been involved in four rounds of Local Foods, Local Places delivering technical assistance to large and medium communities from Maine to Alaska.
        • Melissa Kramer, Ph.D., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of the Administrator-Office of Policy-Office of Community Revitalization (DC) - Melissa began working at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 2002 as an AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow. An Environmental Scientist, she currently works in the U.S. EPA Office of Community Revitalization, where she has managed the Local Foods, Local Places technical assistance program since 2017.
        • Jason Espie, AICP, EPR (VA) - EPR is a Charlottesville-based multidisciplinary design firm founded in 2011 (SAM certified SB+WOSB). EPR focuses its planning practice on the integration of urban design, land use, environmental, and transportation planning to create thriving and equitable communities. EPR staff have applied their wide-ranging capabilities to help clients create comprehensive plans, zoning and subdivision codes that reflect smart growth principles, urban design plans, vision and strategic plans, and small area plans. EPR is the technical assistance provider for Rounds 4 and 5 of the Local Foods, Local Places program for the U.S. EPA.
        • Shantell Bingham, Charlottesville Food Justice Network (VA) - Shantell is the Program Director of the Charlottesville Food Justice Network at City Schoolyard Garden and sits on the Chesapeake Foodshed Network’s Community Ownership, Empowerment & Prosperity Action Team. She holds a B.A. in Global Development Studies and MPH from the University of Virginia and is a 2020 Castanea Fellow.

 

  • Community Control Through Food: The Emerging Field of Equitable Food Oriented Development
    • This workshop will share and discuss a framework for Equitable Food Oriented Development (EFOD), a newly-coalescing field that uses food and agriculture to create economic opportunities, healthy neighborhoods, and community-controlled social, cultural and physical assets. Learn from EFOD practitioners about tools and tactics that can be used to shift power.
      • Presenters:
        • Trisha Chakrabarti, DAISA Enterprises (NY) - Trisha Chakrabarti is leading DAISA's project to explore Equitable Food-Oriented Development as a practice and EFOD organizations on the ground. Prior to that, she was Director of Programs and Policy at Mandela Partners, where she led community-based programming and research in food access, clinical-community linkages, SNAP/EBT acceptance, and healthy retailing.
        • Dennis Bagneris, Liberty's Kitchen (LA) - Dennis brings over 15 years of program management experience to Liberty's Kitchen, where he has held leadership roles since 2011. Prior to becoming CEO, Dennis was Youth Development and Leadership Program Director where he ensured programs had a youth-centered voice.
        • Rashida Ferdinand, Sankofa Community Development Corporation (LA) - Sankofa CDC works with residents and other stakeholders to identify locally-felt social challenges and address them in thoughtful, culturally-competent ways. Sankofa's ultimate goal is to support the creation of a local environment that promotes positive health outcomes and builds healthier communities for generations to come.

 

  • Culture Shift Through Multi-Sectoral Teams: Policies, Procedures, and Tools for Success
    • Community Food Strategies is an intentionally multi-organizational initiative using and modeling practices that reflect our collaborative approach and value in trusted relationships to create the greatest impact for systems change. Our practices have been essential in creating a successful and sustainable team with members across five- soon, six - organizations.
      • Presenters:
        • Gini Knight, Center for Environmental Farming Systems (NC) - Gini holds an MS degree in Conservation Biology and Sustainable Development, started and managed an organic vegetable farm, facilitated several public and private sector teams developing urban and rural conservation practices, and currently works for the Center for Environmental Farming Systems on the Community Food Strategies team.
        • Lindsey Carver, Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina (NC)For over six years, Lindsey has been active in creating sustainable North Carolina food systems through urban agriculture, community outreach, education, and program building. She holds a master's degree in agricultural education, and manages food and healthcare systems partnerships at the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina.
        • Jamilla Hawkins, NC Rural Center (NC) - Jamilla joined the NC Rural Center in July 2017 as the senior program manager for Food and Community Development. In this role, Jamilla works with regional and organizational networks to provide resources to food business entrepreneurs and local farmers that will strengthen the local food systems across the state. She also works with communities across the state to provide community coaching and small-town business development resources.
        • Abbey Piner, Community Food Strategies (NC) - 
          Abbey leads the Community Food Strategies project team who addresses systems change with community through a lens of food policy and racial equity.

 

  • Movement Building and Supporting Farmers "The SAAFON Way"
    • We showcase the importance of promoting a food system that values the farmer as more than their farm. Join us as for a discussion on the importance of creating space for Black farmers to build relationships, networks, and collaborative movement building within a community-based food system.
      • Presenters:
        • Tammy Harris, SAAFON (GA) - 
          Tammy Harris is the SAAFON Network Coordinator for Georgia. Her primary role is to partner with farmers to develop solutions for their farm business in areas relating to farm business management, funding opportunities, peer networking, and product marketing.
        • Alsie Parks, SAAFON (MS) - Alsie activates the use of food as an organizing tool for healing and liberation. A farmer organizer, and agrarian worker she serves SAAFON by carrying this work into her healing modality, intimacy with food, facilitating community dialogue and wellness education that incorporates mindfulness practices, radical resistance, and honoring cultural traditions.
        • Whitney Jaye, SAAFON (GA) - 
          Whitney is a farmer and organizer. She has designed, implemented, and collaborated on a variety of projects, programs, and events in partnership with food movement organizations. She works closely with members of the team to make cross network connections, and craft strategies that reflect farmer insights and a collective vision.  

 

  • Local Food System Development as a Model for Sustainable Change in Impoverished Rural Communities
    • A grassroots effort powered by collaboration with existing community assets is changing things in what many call "the most southern place on earth." Bolivar County Good Food Revolution partners share strategies and lessons learned while working together to build equitable food systems in the MS Delta.
      • Presenters:
        • Judy Belue, Delta Fresh Foods Initiative (MS) - Judy W. Belue, Executive Director for the Delta Fresh Foods Initiative, has 20+ years experience in community organizing, partnership and resource development. She manages the Bolivar County Good Food Revolution and strives to demonstrate respect, resourcefulness and relentless courage in her work.
        • Dr. Leslie Hossfeld, Clemson University (SC) - Dr. Hossfeld has extensive experience in local food system work as Chair of the Sociology Dept at Mississippi University and in her current role as Dean of Sociolgy at Clemson University
        • Nancy Woodruff, Living Well Locally (MS) - 
          Nancy Woodruff degrees from MSU and University of Arizona. Her background includes work in government and non-profit management, natural health and local food advocacy. Woodruff collaborated on a report entitled "Sustaining Mississippi Communities with Local Food" and has presented at the numerous agriculture and sustainability conferences.
        • Dr. DeGil Hadley, Bolivar Center Medical Foundation (MS) - Dr. Hadley is a General Practiioner with a major health provider in the area who has embraced a holistic, real food centered approach to improving health and well being for area residents.

 

  • Rural Food Coalitions -- Growing Systems Change from the Ground Up
    • Please join us for an interactive session exploring questions of power and scale within rural food systems. How do we strengthen alliances across institutional, geographic, and cultural boundaries? Through collaborative exchange, we will begin to identify needs and paths forward for current and future coalition building in our own communities.
      • Presenters:
        • Angie Carter, Michigan Tech University (MI) - Angie Carter is an assistant professor of environmental & energy justice at Michigan Tech University. She is a member of the Western UP Food Systems Council steering team and a board member of the Women, Food and Agriculture Network. She studies agrifood systems, rural communities, and environmental justice.
        • Valoree Gagnon, Michigan Tech University (MI) - Valoree S. Gagnon is the Director for University-Indigenous Community Partnerships at the Great Lakes Research Center at Michigan Technological University. Her work centers on elevating Indigenous peoples and knowledge, facilitating equitable research practice and design, and guiding partnerships that prioritize restoring Indigenous land and life in the Great Lakes region.
        • Rachael Pressley, Western UP Planning and Development Region (MI) - Rachael Pressley is an Assistant Regional Planner for the Western U.P. Planning and Development Region, one of 13 regional planning agencies in Michigan. Her work mainly focuses on hazard mitigation and food system planning. For the past year, Rachael has fostered and coordinated a regional food systems council.

   

  • Engaging food system stakeholders through shared storytelling: the Community Voice Method    
    • Do you want to help build your region's food system in a way that incorporates the perspectives of diverse stakeholders? Do you want to hold meetings that aren't a waste of time? In this hands-on session, rural food hub founders introduce a food system planning approach that foregrounds stakeholder voices.
      • Presenters:
        • Gabriel Cumming, Working Landscapes/Community Voice Consulting (NC) - Gabe is Co-founder and Associate Director of Working Landscapes, where he co-leads development of the Working Landscapes Food Hub and regional food value chains spanning northeastern North Carolina. He is also Principal of Community Voice Consulting. Gabe holds a PhD in Ecology from the University of North Carolina.
        • Carla Norwood, Working Landscapes/Community Voice Consulting (NC) - Carla is Co-founder and Executive Director of Working Landscapes, which is based in her hometown. Her responsibilities encompass strategic planning, administration, fundraising, research, and property development. Carla is also Research Director for Community Voice Consulting. Carla holds a PhD in Ecology from the University of North Carolina.

 

  • Make Yourself Obsolete: Shifting Power from Non-Profit Leadership to Community Leadership
    • Community empowerment happens when non-profits and funders step back and community-based projects thrive. Through facilitated dialogue and examples from successful Community Food Projects - including food hubs, community gardens and a farm-to-school program - attendees will create powerful design templates for shifting non-profit programs to community empowerment, leadership, and self-management.
      • Presenters:
        • Miles Gordon, Kitchen Table Consulting, LLC (CA) - Miles Gordon is a Food Systems Development and Community Engagement leader. He founded the Gardens Project to empower disenfranchised California communities through leadership development and self-management. Miles administered several USDA grants and is a community facilitator for the EPA's Local Food Local Places. He is a Wallace Center Community Food Systems Mentor.
        • Jen Dalton, Kitchen Table Consulting, LLC (CA) - Jen Dalton is founder of Kitchen Table Consulting, LLC. Her expertise includes group facilitation and coaching for multi-stakeholder collaborative impact efforts. As a program director for a regional non-profit, she directed countywide, multi-stakeholder community health improvement initiatives within the policy, systems and environmental change model.

 

  • "A Refugee, A Jew and A Farmer all Walk into the Community Garden......"
    • This session explores deep partnerships across difference that aim at creating a just and food sovereign community. Ekar is a Denver urban farm growing culturally specific food for food pantrys, and hosting International Rescue Committee programs bringing Rohinigya and African survivors of torture onto the farm as they rebuild lives.
      • Presenters:
        • Sue Salinger, Ekar Farm (CO) - Sue Salinger MA, MFA is the Executive Director of  Ekar Farm. She began food systems work in a faith-based context six years ago in Detroit, Michigan where she was the founding managing director of Hazon's Detroit region. Ekar Farm and Community Garden is a communal urban farm that serves as a commons on which to repair the food system and the environment. Rooted in the Jewish vision of creating a more environmentally healthy, socially just and spiritually connected world, Ekar connects people to community, provides experiential and environmental education, grows regenerativally  produced fruits and vegetables expanding access to those in need.
        • Jessica HarperMetro Caring (CO) - Jessica Harper is the Community Activator and Gardener at Metro Caring. She grew up in rural Oregon outside of Portland, and found her way to Colorado in 2012. She has bachelor's degrees in Spanish Language and English Linguistics, along with a master's in Teaching. She loves Metro Caring because for this organisation, it might start with food but doesn't end there.  Metro Caring neets oeioke;s immediate food needs while addressing the root cause of hunger: poverty. They provide nutritious groceries to their neighbors, and offer comprehensive anti-hunger resources so that families can break the cycle of poverty.
        • Letisha Steele, SAME Cafe - Letisha Steele is the Operations Officer & Chef at SAMECafe (So All May Eat). She  began her culinary career when she was 15 in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia.  She received her BA in Counseling Psychology from MSU. Her passion lies in Community Outreach, creating healthy & delicious meals from locally sourced ingredients , and ensuring that healthy food is accessible to everyone, regardless of their socioeconomic status.  SAME Café is a donation-based, fair exchange restaurant that serves healthy food to everyone, regardless of ability to pay. Our mission is to create community through healthy food access. We believe in healthy food, community, and dignity for everyone.

 

  • Community Development of Advocacy Action Plans from the Ground Up
    • Led by youth and residents of the food movement, this skill-building session introduces beginners to the process of developing advocacy action plans for food systems change. Attendees will learn about the key role partnerships and community leadership play in crafting equitable movements before engaging in an advocacy action plan workshop.
      • Presenters:
        • Jeanette Abi-Nader, City Schoolyard Garden, Inc. (VA) - Jeanette Abi-Nader worked for a dozen years with the national food justice non-profit, the Community Food Security Coalition (CFSC). As CFSC’s Evaluation and Training and Capacity Building Director, Jeanette utilized multiple learning strategies to support the work of hundreds of organizations and funders. As CSG's executive director, Jeanette has focused on transforming organizational priorities to align with social justice and racial equity practices.
        • Shantell Bingham, Charlottesville Food Justice Network (VA) - Shantell Bingham is the Program Director of the Charlottesville Food Justice Network. She is a graduate from the University of Virginia’s Master in Public Health program and has a bachelor’s degree in Global Public Health. At UVA, Shantell received the Dalai Lama Fellowship, which awarded her support to co-found the organization called Growing for Change, an urban garden initiative which co-designs personal gardens for citizens living in public housing and low-income areas. Shantell is also 2020 Castanea Fellowship.
        • Tamara Wright, Charlottesville Food Justice Network (VA) - Tami has lived in Charlottesville for most of her life. She is a resident of Friendship Court, where she lives with her four children. She has been involved in food justice for nearly a decade, with the Urban Agriculture Collective of Charlottesville. As the Community Advocate Lead, Tami is a leader in the Food Justice Network’s outreach and mission.
        • Rebecca Jacob, Charlottesville Food Justice Network (VA) - Rebecca is an immigrant from South Sudan. She arrived in 2004 and has worked at the University of Virginia since then. Rebecca is an integral member of the community garden on Greenstone & Fifth, which is part of the IRC New Roots Program. She joined the team as a community advocate fighting to make Charlottesville a food secure city. Rebecca has a daughter in Charlottesville City Schools who enjoys the CSG programming as well!
        • Makayla Howard & Emmanuel Rmero Quezada, Charlottesville High School - Makayla & Manny are students at Charlottesville High School and have grown up in the City Schoolyard Gardens. In their fourth and third year, respectively, as Food Justice Interns, Makayla and Manny are leaders among their peers for food justice, healthy school food and gardening.

 

  • Food Security Strategies for a Healthcare Anchor Institution
    • The Food Security Council at Children's Hospital Colorado is a cross-disciplinary workgroup that has a detailed strategy and roadmap that align with the state's Blueprint to End Hunger. This session will detail the process, partnerships, and results of a healthcare anchor institution supporting their community's food security efforts.
      • Presenter:
        • Reuben Gregory, Children's Hospital Colorado (CO) - Reuben Gregory has spent the last decade in local and regional food systems, working on everything from starting urban farms to co-chairing the local food policy council. He has spent many years dedicated to his local farmers union as well as the food systems efforts of anchor institutions.

 

  • You Too Can Do It! Lessons Learned & Discussion from a SNAP Incentive Ambassador Program
    • Being a Community Food Advocate provides people who have experienced housing instability, joblessness, poverty, and hunger with training and support to effectively lead local outreach while developing leadership skills. This session will offer an activity on being the best advocate you can be through non-verbal, intrapersonal and communication skills.
      • Presenters:
        • Tamara Anne Orndoff, LiveWell Colorado (CO) - Tamara is the Community Food Advocate in Jefferson County. Tamara has been advocating for food, animal, and local business issues for 30 years, bringing a unique passion and strategy that takes advocating to another level. She currently reaches food assistance recipients to double up their food purchases with Colorado Produce.
        • Refugio Venegas, LiveWell Colorado (CO) - I was born in Los Angeles and am married with two children. I've been an Advocate since Summer 2018. I see how expensive healthy foods are to some families here in Colorado and the Country, so I help to promote options for families to have access to more fresh produce.
        • Caronne Porter, LiveWell Colorado (CO) - Caronne supports and strengthens multiple programs and initiatives currently being advanced by LiveWell, with a specific focus on Double Up Food Bucks and related programs. As a key member of the food systems team, she provides partner outreach and engagement, coordinates program logistics, and develops ways to deepen existing programs.

 

  • Cultivating Culture: Reviving the Agricultural Heritage of the Jewish People

Policy/Advocacy

  • Reimagining Food Policy Councils for Racial Equity and Social Action
    • Food policy councils have emerged as a strategy for community food systems change over the past 20 years, with degrees of success in longevity, accountability, and efficacy. CFPAC will facilitate a discussion on how FPCs can organize for greater impact and centralize racial equity in their work.
      • Presenters:
        • Rodger Cooley, Chicago Food Policy Action Council (IL) - 
          Rodger Cooley is Executive Director for the Chicago Food Policy Action Council and has worked for 18+ years developing urban food system policy and projects. Cooley has an M.S. in Urban Planning & Policy from the University of Illinois at Chicago and B.A. from Oberlin College.
        • Marlie Wilson, Chicago Food Policy Action Council (IL) - 
          Marlie Wilson is Good Food Purchasing Project Manager at the Chicago Food Policy Action Council, where she works with the City of Chicago & Cook County on GFPP implementation. She has an M.S. in Agroecology and Urban & Regional Planning from University of Wisconsin-Madison and B.A. from New York University.
        • Brenda Rodriguez, Chicago Food Policy Action Council (IL) - Brenda Rodriguez is Community Partnerships Manager at the Chicago Food Policy Action Council, where she coordinates the Urban Stewards Action Network. She has an MPH in Environmental Health from Johns Hopkins and B.A. from University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

 

  • System Problems Require System Solutions: Changing the Narrative from Food Access to Food Equity
    • This session will describe how local health departments, nonprofits and community members can interface with policymakers to improve food equity. The session will include the story of how the Food Equity Initiative was funded in Charlottesville, VA including the context for success, lessons learned and next steps.
      • Presenters:
        • Rebecca Schmidt, Thomas Jefferson Health District (VA) - Rebecca has worked in public health policy and programming for non-governmental agencies and for local, state and federal government. She holds a B.A. in Social Work and Theater from Boston University and an M.P.A. in Public Policy and Management from the London School of Economics.
        • Shantell Bingham, Charlottesville Food Justice Network (VA) - Shantell is the Program Director of the Charlottesville Food Justice Network at City Schoolyard Garden and sits on the Chesapeake Foodshed Network’s Community Ownership, Empowerment & Prosperity Action Team. She holds a B.A. in Global Development Studies and MPH from the University of Virginia and is a 2020 Castanea Fellow.
        • Jeanette Abi-Nader, City Schoolyard Garden (VA) - Jeanette Abi-Nader came to City Schoolyard Garden as Executive Director with a focus on transforming the organizational priorities to align with social justice and racial equity practices. Prior to CSG, Jeanette worked for a dozen years with the national food justice non-profit, the Community Food Security Coalition (CFSC). As CFSC’s Evaluation and Training and Capacity Building Director, Jeanette utilized multiple learning strategies to support the work of hundreds of organizations and funders.
        • Brooke Ray, International Rescue Committee (VA) - Brooke leads IRC New Roots, a food and agriculture initiative that works with refugees and immigrants in support of their health, community connection and household economics. She also helped create City Schoolyard Garden and Charlottesville SOUP and holds a BA in Community and International Development from the University of Vermont.

 

  • The 2018 Farm Bill and Your Community
    • It's tough to follow the farm bill and what it means for community food systems. Accessing these programs, particularly for underserved communities/producers, can be difficult and confusing. Join the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition and Georgia Organics in learning about the 2018 Farm Bill and how to access its programs.
      • Presenters:
        • Candace Spence, National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (DC) - Candace has an educational background in environmental science and environmental and land use law. She has professional experience developing a clinical education program centered on environmental justice, community economic development and local urban agricultural policy, and a passion for equitable food systems and land ownership, particularly Black owned agricultural land.
        • Wes King, National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (DC) - Wes has worked on sustainability and local food policy issues for ten years. Before joining NSAC in 2016, Wes spent six years at NSAC member organization, Illinois Stewardship Alliance. Prior to that he worked for the Illinois Environmental Council. Wes holds an M.A. and B.A. in Political Science.
        • Michael Wall, Georgia Organics (GA) - Michael serves as the Georgia Organics Director of Farmer Services. He has directly overseen the following USDA program grants: OAO 2501 programs, Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development, Farmers Market Promotion Program, and the Local Food Promotion Program. He has served on the Southern Sustainable Agriculture Working Group Board of Directors.

 

  • Three Decades of Food Policy Councils: Lessons from the Field
    • After three decades and the formation of 400+ food policy councils, there is a lot to learn from the work of these food systems collaborations. This interactive workshop will explore the evolution of FPCs, discuss effective strategies for community inclusion and advocacy and offer opportunities for sharing experiences.
      • Presenters:
        • Anne Palmer, Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (MD) - Anne Palmer is the Food Communities and Public Health program director at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future and a senior research associate at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society. She directs the Food Policy Networks project, which seeks to improve the capacity of new and existing food policy councils and similar organizations to advance food system policies. Anne’s research interests include food access, food policy, food environments, urban agriculture, local and regional food systems, and community food security. In collaboration with seven other universities in the Northeast, she is a co-investigator on a 5-year, USDA-funded research project that explores how to use regional food systems to improve community food security.
        • Mark Winne, Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (NM) - Mark Winne, a noted expert and leading food system policy advocate with over 40 years of community food system and policy experience, brings his experience and expertise to the Food Policy Networks projects in his part-time role as a Senior Advisor.
        • Dawn Plummer, Pittsburgh Food Policy Council (PA) - Dawn Plummer is executive director of the Pittsburgh Food Policy Council and has been working with partners to establish a statewide Pennsylvania Food Policy Council. She has extensive experience serving in a variety of leadership roles with local, national and international networks, and has worked for 19 years alongside leaders most impacted by critical issues of food, food systems, as well as economic, social and racial inequality. Since 2014, Dawn has worked with her team to strengthen the Council as a regional mechanism for food systems decision-making, priority setting and cross sectoral collaboration that aims to build a just, equitable and sustainable food system.
        • Laureen Husband, Operation New Hope (FL) - Laureen Husband is the Director of Strategic Expansion at Operation New Hope where she oversees the replication of the nationally recognized reentry initiative - Ready4Work. She previously worked for the Florida Department of Health in Polk, Duval and Volusia Counties and provided oversight over coalitions, community health programs, strategic planning, community health assessment and improvement. She has extensive experience working with community groups to address socio-economic security and health disparities. She is part of the Kresge Foundation’s Emerging Leaders in Public Health Cohort II.

Youth Engagement

  • Making Agriculture Cool With Youth
    • ABC2 and Men & Women United are dedicated to youth empowerment in rural North Carolina. They are developing community farms and have found success in organizing youth around health outcomes. Join this interactive session to learn from the youth themselves how these programs are empowering young people to become leaders.
      • Presenters:
        • Chester Williams, A Better Chance A Better Community (NC) - Chester works in Halifax County & Roanoke Valley in NC to uplift youth by creating opportunities for them to shape a healthier world. He partners with organizations and agencies and also serves on many committees and local boards as he believes engagement and partnership are key to a healthy community.
        • Randolph Keaton, Men and Women United for Youth and Families (NC) - Randolph is from Bladen County, NC. While serving in the Air Force, he obtained his MA in Human Resources Development from Webster University. He has over 30 years of experience in the Human Services field and currently serves as Director of Men and Women United for Youth and Families, CDC.

 

  • Youth Leadership Development for Food System Change via Community-University Partnerships in Hawaii
    • Food system transformation toward ecological sustainability, social equity and resilience will require developing new forms of critical post-secondary (college) education emphasizing trans-disciplinary, experiential and applied approaches. The panel discussion will engage an innovative model of community-university partnership, profiling the curriculum, pedagogy and impact of the University of Hawaii SCFS program.
      • Presenters:
        • Albie Miles, University of Hawaii - West Oahu (HI) - Dr. Albie Miles is Assistant Professor of Sustainable Community Food Systems at the University of Hawai'i, West O'ahu. Dr. Miles received his Ph.D. in Environmental Science, Policy and Management from UC Berkeley in 2013. He has worked at the UN FAO and the Center for Agroecology at UC Santa Cruz.
        • Sydney Millerd, UHWO SCFS Program (HI) - Sydney Millerd is a Senior undergraduate student in the SCFS program at UHWO.
        • Joshua Fukumoto, MA'O Organic Farms (HI) - 
          MA'O Organic Farms is a 46-acre certified organic farm and social-enterprise located in Wai'anae, Hawaii. MA'O, an acronym for mala (garden) 'ai (food) 'opio (youth) or "youth food garden," affirms the belief that when we restore the relationship between the land and the people, we are able to return abundance and prosperity to the community. All agricultural programs relate to the mission of ʻāina-based (land-based) community development through growing healthy, organic food and youth leadership. MA'O's 2-year Youth Leadership Training (YLT) program sponsors Native Hawaiian and other local youth to complete college.

 

  • Youth Building and Growing Green-The Innovation of the Future
    • The Workshop presents an overview of the successful practices of Youth Building Green, Affordable and Sustainable which utilizes Green Technology with sustainable energy usage and Food Production through Organic Farming Practices. Our Green Technology programming empowers Youth and Families to move from Food Scarcity and Food Deserts to abundance.
      • Presenters:
        • Sister Marsha L. Allen, The Vineyard Farms, Inc. (GA) - MBA- Harvard Business School General Management-1976 BA- University of Pennsylvania City Planning 1974 CUA-Commercial Urban Agriculture Farmer- 2015 Responsible for Oversight and Management of the expansion of Organic Farms, Mobile Farmers' Markets, Proper Nutrition Programs with and for Youth at Risk and their Families in 7 Cities.
        • Sister Jenthia K. Abell, The Vineyard Farm-Atlanta, GA (GA) - Master of Public Administration-Human Resource Management-University of Memphis, TN-1990 BA-English- University of TN - 1983 CUA - Commercial Urban Agriculture Farmer -2015 Responsible for Establishing 2 Youth Farm Cooperatives in the City of Rochester, NY and Atlanta, GA
        • Michael S. Wilson, The Vineyard Farm-Rochester, NY (NY) - 10 Years Experience as a Farmer on a 3 Acre Site in the City of Rochester, NY. His Farming experience includes: Organic Farm "Round Valley Indian Reservation" Covelo, CA (1995-96), Organic Gardening and Maintenance at Heartwood Institute, CA (1996-97). Also trained in Earthen Architecture and serves a a Trainer/Builder
        • Allen L. Griffith, Jr., The Vineyard Farm-Atlanta, GA (GA) - Urban and Rural Farmer for 15 Years, Licensed CDL Driver, Master Auto Mechanic and Carpenter. Responsible for the start-up of new Organic Farms in the 5 remaining Cities for Site Acquisition to Crop Selection, Staffing and Equipment Purchases and implementation of the Youth Training Programs from start-up to operations.

 

  • Beyond community-engaged learning: Cultivating community food systems in the college classroom
    • The course, "Beginning practicum for sustainable food production" at Stetson University challenges students to leverage their food systems "book learning" into community-focused action. This workshop shares student, faculty, and community member perspectives on the course, and suggestions of the crucial role universities can play in building sustainable community food systems.
      • Presenters:
        • Sarah Cramer, Stetson University (FL) - Sarah Cramer is a Brown Teacher-Scholar Fellow in Sustainable Food Systems at Stetson University in DeLand, FL. She holds a PhD in agricultural education and an MPH, both from the University of Missouri. She currently teaches on and researches food, agriculture, social justice, and community engagement.
        • Tara Schuwerk, Stetson University (FL) - Tara J. Schuwerk earned her interdisciplinary PhD in communication from the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University. She is currently the Program Director for Sustainable Food Systems at Stetson University. Her research explores food within intersections of communication, health, culture, and identity.